Law firm founder and managing partner Lisa Coppola has been appointed to the U.S. Small Business Administration’s Region 2 Regulatory Fairness Board by SBA Administrator Jovita Carranza.

Regional Regulatory Fairness Boards in all ten SBA regions represent small business’s voice on regulatory fairness issues. Each board comprises five small business owners and serves as a resource and point of contact for small business owners who feel they have experienced excessive federal regulatory enforcement and compliance actions.  SBA Region II includes New York, New Jersey, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Regional Regulatory Fairness Board members advise Amber Richards, the SBA’s National Ombudsman and Assistant Administrator for Regulatory Enforcement Fairness. The National Ombudsman and Regional Board Members host regulatory fairness hearings, roundtables, and outreach events nationwide. Local small business owners have an opportunity to report concerns about burdensome federal regulations at these regional events.

“As someone who has established a successful small business, Ms. Coppola is well-positioned to advocate for issues impacting small business owners,” Richards said. “The members of the Regulatory Fairness Board play a critical role in making sure the voice of small business is heard by regulators and help to support regulatory solutions that save small businesses time and money.”

As a Region 2 Regulatory Fairness Board member, Coppola will serve as a local resource for small businesses and work with small business trade groups and other entities to address regional concerns about federal regulatory enforcement and compliance issues.

“I am delighted to hear of the appointment of Ms. Coppola to the Region II Regulatory Fairness Board,” said SBA Buffalo District Director Franklin J. Sciortino.  “With her  extensive knowledge of the challenges business owners face and the policies governing small business, I have no doubt Ms. Coppola will play a key role in providing small business awareness and support to help small businesses succeed.”

The Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996 (SBREFA), which created the SBA’s Office of the National Ombudsman, also created five-member Regulatory Fairness Boards in each of the SBA’s ten regions. The members of the Regulatory Fairness Boards represent the small business community to provide insights on immediate regulatory challenges facing small business owners – perspectives that are critical to eliminating ineffective, duplicative, or outmoded regulatory barriers to small business.

For more information about the SBA’s Office of the National Ombudsman, visit the website at www.sba.gov/ombudsman.